May Books of the Month

Chloe

FICTION BOOK OF THE MONTH

A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World by A. C. Fletcher

THE WORLD HAS ENDED. AT LEAST WE STILL HAVE DOGS.

My name's Griz. My childhood wasn't like yours. I've never been to school, I've never had friends, in my whole life I've not met enough people to play a game of football. My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, before all the people went away, but we were never lonely on our remote island. We had each other, and our dogs.

Then the thief came. He told stories of the deserted towns and cities beyond our horizons. I liked him - until I woke to find he had stolen my dog. So I chased him out into the ruins of the world.

I just want to get my dog back, but I found more than I ever imagined was possible. More about how the world ended. More about what my family's real story is. More about what really matters.

A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World is the most moving story you'll read this year.

Perfect for readers of Life of Pi, The Girl with all the Gifts or Station Eleven - Griz's tale mixes sadness and hope in one unforgettable character's journey to retrieve a stolen dog, amid the ruins of our fragile world.

Get 10% off this book for the month of May


NON-FICTION BOOK OF THE MONTH

Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World by M. R. O'Conner

In this compelling narrative, O’Connor seeks out neuroscientists, anthropologists and master navigators to understand how navigation ultimately gave us our humanity. Biologists have been trying to solve the mystery of how organisms have the ability to migrate and orient with such precision—especially since our own adventurous ancestors spread across the world without maps or instruments. O’Connor goes to the Arctic, the Australian bush and the South Pacific to talk to masters of their environment who seek to preserve their traditions at a time when anyone can use a GPS to navigate.

O’Connor explores the neurological basis of spatial orientation within the hippocampus. Without it, people inhabit a dream state, becoming amnesiacs incapable of finding their way, recalling the past, or imagining the future. Studies have shown that the more we exercise our cognitive mapping skills, the greater the grey matter and health of our hippocampus. O’Connor talks to scientists studying how atrophy in the hippocampus is associated with afflictions such as impaired memory, dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease, depression and PTSD.

O’Connor courses from continent to continent, mining anthropology, geography, neurology, psychology, and biology. Whether traditional or technologically enhanced, geographical knowledge is strongly linked with memory; an intriguing hypothesis links mental decline due to aging to the decline in navigating from place to place as one’s world shrinks. Throughout her own travels, O’Connor talked to just the right people in just the right places

Get 10% off this book for the month of May